About your Search

20130117
20130125
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
as the front pages of the paper do you think that is the foreign policy legacy of his first term? >> i think it is. you can't really point to any successes. you heard him in that little sound bite saying we are going to lead. he has been saying the tied of war is receding. it's not reseeding. the tied of war is increasing in all kinds of places like west africa where it hadn't been. the dominance of the united states in the region ever since kissinger is receding. it is the absence of american influence and power which is creating a vacuum into which the jihadists are coming. that's the most important resistance of insurgents is it is in places where we didn't expect it like north africa. it is as if there were jihadists regimes or attacks in central america. that's now the europeans miss it. the number one issue is iran. the prime minister re-elected on tuesday say at the u.n. last year that in spring and summereh a point of no return at which he was announcing israel would have to act. i think obama is going to have to face that either to prevent the israelis in some way or to give a red l
's foreign policy position. he sailed he wouldn't pick him as secretary of state because they have a very different philosophy, bill. bill: we'll see if she mentions some of the more fiery hot spots on the globe today, she's been traveling a million miles, isn't that what she said yesterday. >> reporter: we heard a lot about her traveling more than a million miles as secretary of state. those of who who like hillary clinton were applauding her for her service and her going all over the world and others wanted to ask tough questions about benghazi. martha: i see elizabeth war warren at the table there. is she playing a roam? we are seeing new faces in the senate. >> reporter: i think she has an introduction here. do you want to listen in. martha: sure. >> i know will continue in the tradition of john quincy adams and christian herder as great secretaries from the commonwealth of massachusetts. although john learned more about diplomacy overseas and in the senate he'll be the first to tell you that massachusetts is a great teacher of diplomatic skills. whether it was negotiating his way to
's foreign policy, aid related or diplomacy in our presence throughout the world. you know, if you look back to, say, congress can 20, 25 years ago, it was essentially made up of people who had a relationship to world war ii and its aftermath in terms of u.s. global engagement, the marshall plan and the rebuilding of japan and america's presence. and the relationship also, i mean, and the lessons and the threat posed by the cold war. and those were very defining, major umbrella issues that produced great statesmen, henry jackson and others, on a bipartisan politics at the water's edge, america's presence b and engagement around the world. two superpowers of the um real la that kind of -- umbrella was kind of held over the world and stifled the kind of regional and local factions and tensions that erupted after the end of the cold war. that all had a significant impact on the american people and commitment, i think, and support for the commitment for the u.s. to be a global, globally engaged, the superpower. um, it was the possibility of a five-alarm fire, and everybody's in to try to keep th
some key lines that might be a sign of what's to come in his second term foreign policy. let's listen to a bit of what the president said yesterday. >> we, the people, still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. our citizens seared by the memory of those we have lost know too well the price that is paid for liberty. the knowledge of their sacrifice will keep us forever vigilant against those who would do us harm, but we are also heirs to those who won the peace and not just the war, who turned sworn enemies into the surest of friends, and we must carry those lessons into this time as well. we will show the courage to try and resolve our differences with other nations peacefully, not because we are naive about the dangers we face, but because engagement can more durably lift suspicion and fear. >> that's what i like about president obama and one of the many reasons i like him, because of that. could that be an olive branch the president might extend to nations such as, let's say it, iran, and if so, will they respond in tehran? richard engel is
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)